Between-Word Simplification Patterns in the Continuous Speech of Children With Speech Sound Disorders Purpose This study was designed to identify and describe between-word simplification patterns in the continuous speech of children with speech sound disorders. It was hypothesized that word combinations would reveal phonological changes that were unobserved with single words, possibly accounting for discrepancies between the intelligibility of single-word samples and that ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 2009
Between-Word Simplification Patterns in the Continuous Speech of Children With Speech Sound Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Harriet B. Klein
    New York University, New York
  • May Liu-Shea
    New York University, New York
  • Contact author: Harriet B. Klein, 665 Broadway, Room 928, New York, NY 10012. E-mail: harriet.klein@nyu.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 2009
Between-Word Simplification Patterns in the Continuous Speech of Children With Speech Sound Disorders
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2009, Vol. 40, 17-30. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2008/08-0008)
History: Received January 30, 2008 , Accepted April 14, 2008
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2009, Vol. 40, 17-30. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2008/08-0008)
History: Received January 30, 2008; Accepted April 14, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5

Purpose This study was designed to identify and describe between-word simplification patterns in the continuous speech of children with speech sound disorders. It was hypothesized that word combinations would reveal phonological changes that were unobserved with single words, possibly accounting for discrepancies between the intelligibility of single-word samples and that of continuous speech.

Method Four boys with developmental speech sound disorders provided samples of single words and continuous speech. Substitutions and deletions with single words formed the basis for determining 2 categories of between-word segment mismatches: observed and novel. Mismatches were attributed to one of 4 types of between-word simplifications reported for typical phonological development: between-word consonant deletion, between-word cluster reduction, between-word consonant sequence reduction, and between-word assimilation.

Results Continuous speech revealed observed and novel patterns. Segment mismatches occurred differentially among potential between-word simplification environments. The most frequently occurring novel pattern involved the deletion of a coda consonant within a between-word consonant sequence.

Conclusions Children with speech sound disorders demonstrated substitutions and deletions between words in continuous speech that may not be predicted on the basis of single-word productions. The identification of potential contexts for such mismatches may serve as a framework for the assessment of continuous speech samples of children with speech sound disorders in health care and school settings.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a New York University, Steinhardt School of Education Research Challenge Grant. Reports of this research were presented at the annual conventions of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (2007) and the New York Speech Language Hearing Association (2005). We would like to thank Simcha Pruss, Marissa Ramos, and Rifki Zoltan, who assisted with the transcription and analysis of data. Special appreciation is extended to the children who participated and their parents who made their participation possible. We would also like to thank our colleagues who read earlier drafts of the manuscript: Elaine Altman, Maria Grigos, Nelson Moses, Sylvia Walters, and Christina Reuterskiold.
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