Incorporating Computer-Aided Language Sample Analysis Into Clinical Practice Purpose During the evaluation of language abilities, the needs of the child are best served when multiple types and sources of data are included in the evaluation process. Current educational policies and practice guidelines further dictate the use of authentic assessment data to inform diagnosis and treatment planning. Language sampling ... Tutorial
Tutorial  |   April 01, 2010
Incorporating Computer-Aided Language Sample Analysis Into Clinical Practice
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa Hammett Price
    Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Indiana
  • Sean Hendricks
    The University of Georgia, Athens
  • Colleen Cook
    Gainesville City School System, Gainesville, GA
  • Contact author: Lisa Hammett Price, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Department of Special Education and Clinical Services, 85 McHenry Road, Indiana, PA 15701. E-mail: lprice@iup.edu.
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Tutorial
Tutorial   |   April 01, 2010
Incorporating Computer-Aided Language Sample Analysis Into Clinical Practice
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2010, Vol. 41, 206-222. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2009/08-0054)
History: Received May 9, 2008 , Revised September 10, 2008 , Accepted January 6, 2009
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2010, Vol. 41, 206-222. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2009/08-0054)
History: Received May 9, 2008; Revised September 10, 2008; Accepted January 6, 2009
Web of Science® Times Cited: 13

Purpose During the evaluation of language abilities, the needs of the child are best served when multiple types and sources of data are included in the evaluation process. Current educational policies and practice guidelines further dictate the use of authentic assessment data to inform diagnosis and treatment planning. Language sampling and analysis (LSA) offers an important clinical tool for gathering such authentic assessment data, and computer-aided methods of LSA make it clinically feasible. The purpose of this tutorial is to provide step-by-step procedures for computer-aided LSA (CLSA).

Method This tutorial includes instructions for a 4-step CLSA process: (a) eliciting a representative sample of the child’s language and recording it directly onto the computer; (b) transcribing the language sample; (c) analyzing the language sample and interpreting the results using a readily available software program, Systematic Analysis of Language Transcripts (SALT; J. Miller & A. Iglesias, 2006); and (d) using the results to plan the child’s treatment goals and activities. A case study is provided to illustrate this process.

Implications Digital technologies can dramatically improve the feasibility of LSA, potentially transforming clinical practice by providing a quantifiable but naturalistic measure of language. This tutorial will facilitate the integration of useful technologies into clinical practice and provide information regarding the application of CLSA data.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The work included here was supported by a Dissertation Completion grant by The University of Georgia Graduate School and a Bamford-Lahey Children’s Foundation Scholarship, both awarded to the first author. We wish to thank SLPs Laura Day, Rebecca Sisk, Vanessa Rakaczky, and Seana Hollingsworth for their helpful comments on the article and their willingness to try the programs and procedures. We also wish to thank the family of the child whose case appears in the article, as well as Northeast Georgia Medical Center, where the third author was employed when the data were collected.
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