Family Quality of Life Following Early Identification of Deafness Purpose Family members' perceptions of their quality of life were examined following early identification of deafness in children. Method A questionnaire was used to solicit ratings of satisfaction from the family members of 207 children who were deaf and younger than 6 years of age. Results ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2010
Family Quality of Life Following Early Identification of Deafness
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carla W. Jackson
    Florida State University, Tallahassee
  • Jane R. Wegner
    University of Kansas, Kansas City
  • Ann P. Turnbull
    University of Kansas, Kansas City
  • Contact author: Carla Wood Jackson, Florida State University, Communication Disorders, 109 Regional Rehabilitation Center, Tallahassee, FL 32309. E-mail: cjackson3@fsu.edu.
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2010
Family Quality of Life Following Early Identification of Deafness
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2010, Vol. 41, 194-205. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2009/07-0093)
History: Received December 31, 2007 , Accepted December 23, 2008
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2010, Vol. 41, 194-205. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2009/07-0093)
History: Received December 31, 2007; Accepted December 23, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 17

Purpose Family members' perceptions of their quality of life were examined following early identification of deafness in children.

Method A questionnaire was used to solicit ratings of satisfaction from the family members of 207 children who were deaf and younger than 6 years of age.

Results Results indicated that families were generally satisfied with the areas of family life surveyed. Descriptive analysis suggested lower satisfaction ratings in the area of emotional well-being. Families also reported that their child’s deafness had the largest impact on their emotional well-being. Family members of children using oral communication with a cochlear implant reported higher satisfaction with their child’s speech production and perception outcomes than family members of children using hearing aids alone.

Implications We recommend that service providers and early hearing detection and intervention program coordinators consider additional supports for family well-being following the early identification of deafness in children.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
We would like to thank the families for sharing their insights and experiences with us. Sincere thanks are also extended to Debora Daniels, Sally Roberts, and Diane Frome Loeb, who provided feedback on an earlier version of the manuscript.
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