Language and Literacy Curriculum Supplement for Preschoolers Who Are Academically At Risk: A Feasibility Study PurposeThe potential benefit that a low-cost scripted language and literacy supplemental curriculum titled Read It Again! (RIA; L. M. Justice, A. S. McGinty, A. R. Beckman, & C. R. Kilday, 2006) may have on preschool-age children’s skills was explored. RIA was developed to meet the needs of preschool educators who ... Article
Article  |   April 2010
Language and Literacy Curriculum Supplement for Preschoolers Who Are Academically At Risk: A Feasibility Study
 
Author Notes
  • Contact author: Laura Justice, Arps Hall, School of Teaching and Learning, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210. E-mail: justice.57@osu.edu.
  • © 2010 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Normal Language Processing
Article   |   April 2010
Language and Literacy Curriculum Supplement for Preschoolers Who Are Academically At Risk: A Feasibility Study
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2010, Vol. 41, 161-178. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2009/08-0058)
History: Received May 26, 2008 , Revised November 7, 2008 , Accepted February 2, 2009
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2010, Vol. 41, 161-178. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2009/08-0058)
History: Received May 26, 2008; Revised November 7, 2008; Accepted February 2, 2009
Web of Science® Times Cited: 17

PurposeThe potential benefit that a low-cost scripted language and literacy supplemental curriculum titled Read It Again! (RIA; L. M. Justice, A. S. McGinty, A. R. Beckman, & C. R. Kilday, 2006) may have on preschool-age children’s skills was explored. RIA was developed to meet the needs of preschool educators who may not have access to current commercially available high-cost language and literacy curricula, which often require ongoing intensive professional development. RIA involves implementing 60 large-group lessons over a 30-week period that feature repeated use of 15 commercial storybooks.

MethodUsing a quasi-experimental pre–post research design, 11 preschool teachers implemented RIA in their classrooms for an academic year, and 9 teachers working in comparable preschool programs served as comparisons. Language and literacy measures were collected in the fall and spring of the year.

ResultsChildren whose teachers implemented RIA had higher scores in the spring on measures of language (i.e., grammar and vocabulary) and measures of literacy (i.e., rhyme, alliteration, and print). Effect-size estimates were consistent with medium- to large-size effects.

ConclusionsRIA may be a viable means of enhancing the language and literacy instruction that is delivered within preschool classrooms and, therefore, a means of enhancing children’s language and literacy learning. Future directions for continued evaluation of RIA are discussed.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
This study was supported in part by the West Virginia Department of Education and in part by the U.S. Department of Education, Institutes for Education Sciences Award Grant R305F05124. These data were collected while the second author was on a Predoctoral Training Fellowship awarded to the University of Virginia Interdisciplinary Doctoral Training Program in Education Sciences, supported by the Institute of Education Sciences U.S. Department of Education Award R305B040049. The authors are grateful to the administrators, teachers, pupils, and research assistants who participated in this study.
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