It’s NOT Too Late to Help Adolescents Succeed in School During the early 1900s, when “speech teachers” first began to provide services for public school children in America, professionals recognized the importance of effective communication skills for academic success. This point is well explained by Duchan (this issue), who reports that during this “progressive era” of school reform, emphasis ... Editorial
Editorial  |   April 01, 2010
It’s NOT Too Late to Help Adolescents Succeed in School
 
Author Notes
  • Marilyn A. Nippold, PhDEditor
Article Information
Editorial
Editorial   |   April 01, 2010
It’s NOT Too Late to Help Adolescents Succeed in School
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2010, Vol. 41, 137-138. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2010/ed-02)
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2010, Vol. 41, 137-138. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2010/ed-02)
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5
During the early 1900s, when “speech teachers” first began to provide services for public school children in America, professionals recognized the importance of effective communication skills for academic success. This point is well explained by Duchan (this issue), who reports that during this “progressive era” of school reform, emphasis was placed on the treatment of speech disorders such as stuttering. At the time, little or no attention was given to children with language disorders. Unfortunately, those who struggled to learn because of a language disorder were often described as “backward,” “dull,” “feeble minded,” or “stupid.” Thankfully, such terms are no longer used, and tremendous progress has occurred in understanding the nature of language disorders in children, as well as effective methods of assessment and intervention (e.g., see Berninger et al., this issue; Hammett Price, Hendricks, & Cook, this issue; and Justice et al., this issue).
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