Clinical Forum  |   January 2010
The National Outcomes Measurement System for Pediatric Speech-Language Pathology
Author Notes
  • Contact author: Tracy Schooling, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association National Center for Evidence-based Practice in Communication Disorders, 2200 Research Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20850. E-mail: TSchooling@asha.org.
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / School-Based Settings / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum   |   January 2010
The National Outcomes Measurement System for Pediatric Speech-Language Pathology
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools January 2010, Vol.41, 44-60. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2009/08-0051)
History: Accepted 24 Sep 2008 , Received 02 May 2008
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools January 2010, Vol.41, 44-60. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2009/08-0051)
History: Accepted 24 Sep 2008 , Received 02 May 2008

Purpose: The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association’s (ASHA’s) National Outcomes Measurement System (NOMS) was developed in the late 1990s. The primary purpose was to serve as a source of data for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) who found themselves called on to provide empirical evidence of the functional outcomes associated with their clinical services for child and adult clients who were exhibiting various speech-language pathologies. The present discourse focuses on data that were collected in school settings from the prekindergarten NOMS and the K–12 NOMS. This initial account describes how the data collection systems were developed and the data were collected as well as an overview of the information contained in these databases.

Method: ASHA’s Functional Communication Measures (FCMs) were used to describe the disorder-specific communicative dysfunction(s) of each student. These data were obtained at the initiation of a child’s speech-language pathology services and again at the time of discharge from these treatments by the SLP.

Results: As of December 2007, data on more than 2,000 preschool students and 14,000 K–12 students have been reported to these 2 NOMS components by SLPs working in school settings.

Discussion: The availability of these data has proven to be a very valuable tool with respect to the efforts of school-based SLPs and administrators to document the beneficial impact of speech-language pathology services in school settings.

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