Predictors of Hearing Aid Use Time in Children With Mild-to-Severe Hearing Loss Purpose This study investigated predictors of hearing aid (HA) use time for children with mild-to-severe hearing loss (HL). Barriers to consistent HA use and reliability of parent report measures were also examined. Method Participants included parents of 272 children with HL. Parents estimated the amount of time the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 2013
Predictors of Hearing Aid Use Time in Children With Mild-to-Severe Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elizabeth A. Walker
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Meredith Spratford
    Center for Childhood Deafness, Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE
  • Mary Pat Moeller
    Center for Childhood Deafness, Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE
  • Jacob Oleson
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Hua Ou
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Patricia Roush
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Shana Jacobs
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Correspondence to Elizabeth A. Walker: elizabeth-walker@uiowa.edu
  • Editor: Marilyn Nippold
    Editor: Marilyn Nippold×
  • Associate Editor: Sheila Pratt
    Associate Editor: Sheila Pratt×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / School-Based Settings / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 2013
Predictors of Hearing Aid Use Time in Children With Mild-to-Severe Hearing Loss
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2013, Vol. 44, 73-88. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2012/12-0005)
History: Received January 13, 2012 , Accepted July 24, 2012
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2013, Vol. 44, 73-88. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2012/12-0005)
History: Received January 13, 2012; Accepted July 24, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 21

Purpose This study investigated predictors of hearing aid (HA) use time for children with mild-to-severe hearing loss (HL). Barriers to consistent HA use and reliability of parent report measures were also examined.

Method Participants included parents of 272 children with HL. Parents estimated the amount of time the child used HAs daily. Regression analysis examined the relationships among independent variables and HA use time. To determine parental accuracy of HA use time, datalogging from the HAs was compared to the parents' estimates.

Results Longer HA use related to older age, poorer hearing, and higher maternal education. Parental consistency ratings revealed similar findings—younger children and children with milder HL wore HAs less consistently than older children and children with more severe HL. Parents' estimates and datalogging were significantly correlated; however, results suggested that parents overestimate the amount of time their children wear their HAs.

Conclusion Certain variables were significantly related to the amount of time children wore their HAs. Consistency rating scales provided insight into circumstances that were challenging for families. Use of both parent reports and datalogging may allow clinicians and researchers to obtain a general estimate of HA use time.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This work was supported by National Institutes of Health Grants 5 ROI DC009560-03 (co-principal investigators, J. Bruce Tomblin, University of Iowa, and Mary Pat Moeller, Boys Town National Research Hospital). The following people provided support or assistance at various points in the project: J. Bruce Tomblin provided support and input throughout the project, and Rick Arenas managed the subject database. A special thanks goes to Marlea O’Brien for coordinating the OCHL project, as well as to the examiners at the University of Iowa, Boys Town National Research Hospital, and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the families and children who participated in the research. The content of this project is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders or the National Institutes of Health.
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