Morphological Analysis in Context Versus Isolation: Use of a Dynamic Assessment Task With School-Age Children Purpose The current study investigated the ability of typically developing children in Grades 3 and 5 to use morphological analysis to determine the meanings of derived words with and without context clues. Also of interest was the relation between children’s reading practices and their performance in determining the meanings of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 2013
Morphological Analysis in Context Versus Isolation: Use of a Dynamic Assessment Task With School-Age Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gayatri Ram
    Ohio University, Athens
  • Sally A. Marinellie
    Ohio University, Athens
  • Joann Benigno
    Ohio University, Athens
  • John McCarthy
    Ohio University, Athens
  • Correspondence to Gayatri Ram: gr144007@ohio.edu
  • Editor: Marilyn Nippold
    Editor: Marilyn Nippold×
  • Associate Editor: Stacy Wagovich
    Associate Editor: Stacy Wagovich×
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 2013
Morphological Analysis in Context Versus Isolation: Use of a Dynamic Assessment Task With School-Age Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2013, Vol. 44, 32-47. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2012/11-0023)
History: Received April 18, 2011 , Revised August 10, 2011 , Accepted May 22, 2012
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2013, Vol. 44, 32-47. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2012/11-0023)
History: Received April 18, 2011; Revised August 10, 2011; Accepted May 22, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5

Purpose The current study investigated the ability of typically developing children in Grades 3 and 5 to use morphological analysis to determine the meanings of derived words with and without context clues. Also of interest was the relation between children’s reading practices and their performance in determining the meanings of derived words.

Method Children provided definitions for 20 low-frequency derived words that were presented to them in isolation and in context. Responses were scored on a scale of 0 to 5 based on the children’s performance on the Dynamic Assessment of Morphological Analysis—Modified (DATMA–M), which was created by the authors.

Results Results indicated a large variability in the children’s performance on the DATMA–M. Children in Grade 5 achieved significantly higher scores as compared to children in Grade 3. Overall, children performed better in the context condition than the isolation condition. Significant correlations were found for reading frequency and DATMA–M scores. There was no significant difference in performance between the isolation and context conditions after controlling for reading frequency.

Conclusion The findings of this study emphasize the need for continued research to enable speech-language pathologists to use assessments such as the DATMA–M to obtain insights into the morphological analytical skills of school-age children.

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