LSHSS Is Critical to the Practice of School Speech-Language Pathology 2013 brings a new challenge for me. I am honored and excited to begin a 3-year term as editor of Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools. In this issue, I’d like to share a little bit about myself and what I bring to my role as editor. I ... Editorial
Editorial  |   January 01, 2013
LSHSS Is Critical to the Practice of School Speech-Language Pathology
 
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Editorial
Editorial   |   January 01, 2013
LSHSS Is Critical to the Practice of School Speech-Language Pathology
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2013, Vol. 44, 1-2. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2013/ed-01)
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2013, Vol. 44, 1-2. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2013/ed-01)
2013 brings a new challenge for me. I am honored and excited to begin a 3-year term as editor of Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools. In this issue, I’d like to share a little bit about myself and what I bring to my role as editor.
I think LSHSS is a valuable resource for school speech-language pathologists (SLPs). I join a long line of editors who have cared deeply about the services children in schools receive. I began reading LSHSS in graduate school, and LSHSS was an important resource when I began my career as a school SLP in 1984. I took a trip down memory lane today and paged through (albeit digitally!) the issues of LSHSS published when I was in college and graduate school. I found several articles that I remember well, articles that had an impact on me as I began my career as a school SLP. Carol Westby’s “Assessment of Cognitive and Language Abilities Through Play” (1980)  was instrumental in making me think about the relations between language and cognition, and the importance of knowing something about my preschoolers' and kindergartners' play skills as I planned developmentally appropriate activities for their therapy sessions. Dorothy Tyack’s “Teaching Complex Sentences” (1981) made me realize that there was a lot more to grammatical knowledge than 14 grammatical morphemes—and at the time, I could never have known that I would have a research career with a focus on complex syntax acquisition! I read Edna Carter’s “A Language Approach to Treatment of Phonological Process Problems” (1983) several times as I was challenged to serve many, many children who had more than 60 errors on the Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation (Goldman & Fristoe, 1969). Charlann Simon’s “Functional-Pragmatic Evaluation of Communication Skills in School-Aged Children” (1984) offered more help than I could have hoped for in figuring out what to do with my fourth, fifth, and sixth graders. And Judith Johnston’s “Narratives: A New Look at Communication Problems in Older Language-Disordered Children” (1982) opened my world to Dr. Johnston’s marvelous writing—writing that always made me pause and think of old problems in new ways (new forms, old functions).
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