The Effect of Test Presentation on Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders and Neurotypical Peers Purpose The purpose of this experiment was to determine if there is alternate forms reliability for paper- and computer-administered standardized vocabulary tests. Another purpose was to determine whether the behavioral ratings of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) would improve during the computer-administered testing sessions secondary to a decreased need ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2012
The Effect of Test Presentation on Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders and Neurotypical Peers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary Alt
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Melanie Humphrey Moreno
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Correspondence to Mary Alt: malt@email.arizona.edu
  • Editor: Marilyn Nippold
    Editor: Marilyn Nippold×
  • Associate Editor: Jeannene Ward-Lonergan
    Associate Editor: Jeannene Ward-Lonergan×
Article Information
Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2012
The Effect of Test Presentation on Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders and Neurotypical Peers
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2012, Vol. 43, 121-131. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2011/10-0092)
History: Received October 25, 2010 , Revised March 7, 2011 , Accepted July 24, 2011
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2012, Vol. 43, 121-131. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2011/10-0092)
History: Received October 25, 2010; Revised March 7, 2011; Accepted July 24, 2011

Purpose The purpose of this experiment was to determine if there is alternate forms reliability for paper- and computer-administered standardized vocabulary tests. Another purpose was to determine whether the behavioral ratings of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) would improve during the computer-administered testing sessions secondary to a decreased need for social interaction.

Method Thirty-six school-age children (half with ASDs, half neurotypical [NT]) took 2 versions (i.e., paper vs. computer) of the Expressive One-Word Picture Vocabulary Test (EOWPVT–2000; Brownell, 2000a) and the Receptive One-Word Picture Vocabulary Test (ROWPVT–2000; Brownell, 2000b). Order of presentation was counterbalanced across participants. Test sessions were videotaped, and randomly selected 1-min intervals were rated for behaviors. Standardized test scores and behavior ratings were compared for equivalence across the test presentation methods.

Results Standard scores for both versions of the tests were not significantly different for both groups of participants. There were no differences in behavioral ratings between the two methods of test presentation.

Conclusion Alternate forms reliability was found, thus expanding the options for testing for school-age populations. The use of computers had no effect on the behaviors of the children with ASDs. The ramifications of this finding for assessment and intervention for children with ASDs are discussed.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The work for this paper began as part of the second author’s master’s thesis. Preliminary findings were presented at the Arizona State Speech-Language-Hearing Association Conference in April 2010. We would like to thank all of the families who participated in this project, as well as all of the people who supported this work.
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