Peer Victimization Among Students With Specific Language Impairment, Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, and Typical Development Purpose The potential contributions of behavioral and verbal liabilities to social risk were examined by comparing peer victimization levels in children with specific language impairment (SLI) to those in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and typically developing (TD) children. Method Sixty children (age range: 7–8 years) participated in ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2011
Peer Victimization Among Students With Specific Language Impairment, Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, and Typical Development
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sean M. Redmond
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Correspondence to Sean M. Redmond: sean.redmond@health.utah.edu
  • Editor: Marilyn Nippold
    Editor: Marilyn Nippold×
  • Associate Editor: Martin Fujiki
    Associate Editor: Martin Fujiki×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2011
Peer Victimization Among Students With Specific Language Impairment, Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, and Typical Development
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2011, Vol. 42, 520-535. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2011/10-0078)
History: Received September 21, 2010 , Revised January 7, 2011 , Accepted February 3, 2011
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2011, Vol. 42, 520-535. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2011/10-0078)
History: Received September 21, 2010; Revised January 7, 2011; Accepted February 3, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 20

Purpose The potential contributions of behavioral and verbal liabilities to social risk were examined by comparing peer victimization levels in children with specific language impairment (SLI) to those in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and typically developing (TD) children.

Method Sixty children (age range: 7–8 years) participated in the study. Standardized verbal measures and parent ratings of behavioral difficulties were combined with children’s self-reports of their school and peer environments to examine the risk for negative peer experiences associated with clinical status.

Results Clinical status was associated with elevated levels of victimization, especially for participants with SLI. A potential buffering effect for number of close friendships was found for participants with ADHD and TD participants, but not for participants with SLI. Peer victimization was associated with elevated levels of hyperactivity and stronger narrative skills for participants with SLI.

Conclusion These results highlight the importance of peer victimization in the social adjustment of students with developmental language disorders.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Funding was provided by Grant 5R03CD838 “Psycholinguistic and Socioemotional Profiling of SLI and ADHD” from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. Portions of this study were presented at the 2009 Symposium for Research on Child Language Disorders (SRCLD) annual convention, Madison, WI. This study would not have been possible without the generosity and patience of the participants and their families. Appreciation is extended to the following people for their assistance in recruiting potential participants: Rebecca Garda (Jordan School District), Lisa Holmstead (Salt Lake City School District), Linda Smith (Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder), Carrie Francis (Boys and Girls Club), Janet Goldstein (University of Utah Speech, Language, and Hearing Clinic), and Sandra Gillam (Utah State University). Sam Goldstein (Neurology, Learning, and Behavior Center) also provided valuable consultation to the project. Several graduate and undergraduate students from the University of Utah’s Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders assisted in various aspects of the project and deserve recognition for their contributions: Chelsea Ash, Tiffany Boman, Lyndi Ballard, Melanie Cobabe, Jamie Dressler, Britta Rajamaki, Heather Thompson, Jennifer Thinnes Whittaker, and Melissa Whitchurch.
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