Article  |   October 2011
Program Intensity and Service Delivery Models in the Schools: SLP Survey Results
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jayne Brandel
    Fort Hays State University, Hays, KS
  • Diane Frome Loeb
    The University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Correspondence to Jayne Brandel: jmbrandel@fhsu.edu
  • Editor: Marilyn Nippold
    Editor: Marilyn Nippold×
  • Associate Editor: Shari Robertson
    Associate Editor: Shari Robertson×
School-Based Settings / Practice Management
Article   |   October 2011
Program Intensity and Service Delivery Models in the Schools: SLP Survey Results
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools October 2011, Vol.42, 461-490. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2011/10-0019
History: Accepted 22 Jan 2011 , Received 17 Mar 2010 , Revised 04 Sep 2010
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools October 2011, Vol.42, 461-490. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2011/10-0019
History: Accepted 22 Jan 2011 , Received 17 Mar 2010 , Revised 04 Sep 2010

Purpose: School-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) routinely work with team members to make recommendations regarding an intervention program’s intensity and method of service delivery for children with speech and language impairments. In this study, student, SLP, and workplace characteristics that may influence SLPs' recommendations were examined.

Method: Almost 2,000 school-based SLPs completed an online survey about the factors they consider when making recommendations regarding program intensity and service delivery model that students on their caseloads receive.

Results: SLPs reported that student characteristics, rather than SLP or workplace characteristics, were the factors they considered the most when making these recommendations. However, these same SLPs reported that current students on their caseload with severe to moderate disabilities participated in intervention 2–3 times a week for 20–30 min in groups outside of the classroom. Students with the least severe disability received intervention 1 time a week for 20–30 min in groups outside of the classroom.

Conclusion: The limited variety of intervention program intensities and service delivery models used suggests that student characteristics may not be the most important factor considered when making intervention recommendations, as reported by the SLPs. Instead, caseload size and years of practice appear to influence SLPs' recommendations regarding which program intensity and service delivery models to use.

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