Addressing Clinician–Client Mismatch: A Preliminary Intervention Study With a Bilingual Vietnamese–English Preschooler Purpose This project examined receptive vocabulary treatment outcomes in the two languages of a bilingual preschooler with moderate to severe language impairment. Method A series of single-subject experimental designs was used to compare English-only (EO) and bilingual (BI) approaches to receptive vocabulary treatment. The participant, Nam, was a ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2011
Addressing Clinician–Client Mismatch: A Preliminary Intervention Study With a Bilingual Vietnamese–English Preschooler
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Giang Pham
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Kathryn Kohnert
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Deanine Mann
    Centennial Early Childhood Special Education, Lino Lakes, MN
  • Correspondence to Giang Pham: tangx098@umn.edu
  • Editor: Marilyn Nippold
    Editor: Marilyn Nippold×
  • Associate Editor: Amy Weiss
    Associate Editor: Amy Weiss×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2011
Addressing Clinician–Client Mismatch: A Preliminary Intervention Study With a Bilingual Vietnamese–English Preschooler
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2011, Vol. 42, 408-422. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2011/10-0073)
History: Received August 24, 2010 , Accepted January 7, 2011
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2011, Vol. 42, 408-422. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2011/10-0073)
History: Received August 24, 2010; Accepted January 7, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 6

Purpose This project examined receptive vocabulary treatment outcomes in the two languages of a bilingual preschooler with moderate to severe language impairment.

Method A series of single-subject experimental designs was used to compare English-only (EO) and bilingual (BI) approaches to receptive vocabulary treatment. The participant, Nam, was a boy age 3;11 (years;months) who was learning Vietnamese as a first language at home and English in his early childhood education program. Treatment was implemented by an EO interventionist using a computer interface and prerecorded audio files in Vietnamese and English. The dependent measure was the percentage of items that were correctly identified in each language.

Results Combined studies revealed that the BI approach increased Nam’s attention to task and was as effective as the EO approach for increasing his receptive vocabulary in English. Nam made vocabulary gains in both treatment conditions; receptive vocabulary gains were evident in both Vietnamese and English.

Conclusion This project showed that it is feasible for an EO clinician to promote gains in both the home and school languages of a BI child through creative collaborations with BI colleagues and the use of technology. Replication with additional participants and treatment activities is needed to make further generalizations.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This research was supported in part by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (F31HD055113, PI: G. Pham) and the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (R21DC010868, PI: K. Kohnert). Portions of this paper were presented at the 31st Annual Symposium on Research in Child Language Disorders in Madison, WI, and the 2010 Language Impairment in Monolingual and Bilingual Society Conference in Aalborg, Denmark. We would like to acknowledge Joe Reichle and Frank Symons for input on SSED and the participant, his family, and Marianne Erlien for collaboration on this project.
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