Language Intervention in the Classroom: What It Looks Like Recently, I had the opportunity to observe a middle-school language arts class in session. The class, which meets five mornings a week for 45 minutes, has an enrollment of 14 students. On the day that I observed, the students were learning about Shakespeare’s plays. Sitting at large tables around ... From the Editor
From the Editor  |   October 2011
Language Intervention in the Classroom: What It Looks Like
 
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  • © 2011 American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / From the Editor
From the Editor   |   October 2011
Language Intervention in the Classroom: What It Looks Like
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2011, Vol. 42, 393-394. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2011/ed-04)
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2011, Vol. 42, 393-394. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2011/ed-04)
Recently, I had the opportunity to observe a middle-school language arts class in session. The class, which meets five mornings a week for 45 minutes, has an enrollment of 14 students. On the day that I observed, the students were learning about Shakespeare’s plays. Sitting at large tables around the classroom, they took turns reading aloud from their workbooks and were occasionally interrupted by their teacher and asked to explain the meaning of words they encountered (e.g., baritone,soprano,exclaim,proclaim). When difficulties arose, the teacher or her assistant—both of whom were knowledgeable and enthusiastic—encouraged the students to look for context clues surrounding the words, examine morphological patterns, and consult a dictionary to clarify or confirm their understanding of the words. No snickering occurred if a classmate struggled to pronounce a word or took a long time to answer a question. Rather, the class waited patiently as the teacher or her assistant provided just enough scaffolding to ensure that every student was successful that day. I left the school feeling heartened by the many positive and productive interactions I observed between these middle-school students and their teachers.
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