Phonological Awareness Evidence To Influence Assessment and Intervention Practices Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   October 01, 2005
Phonological Awareness
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gail T. Gillon
    Department of Communication Disorders, University of Canterbury, Private Bag, 4800 Christchurch, New Zealand
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Forum: Phonological Awareness
Clinical Forum   |   October 01, 2005
Phonological Awareness
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2005, Vol. 36, 281-284. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2005/028)
History: Received April 25, 2005 , Accepted April 27, 2005
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2005, Vol. 36, 281-284. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2005/028)
History: Received April 25, 2005; Accepted April 27, 2005
Scientific evidence has shifted our profession of speech-language pathology to a position where it is no longer acceptable to claim successful treatment of children with speech-language impairment if the outcome is improvement in only spoken genres. Rather, treatment outcomes for children’s written language development must also be considered. In striving to make a positive difference to the social and academic performance of children with communication impairment, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) need to address underlying spoken language knowledge that will build the foundation for successful reading and writing experiences. Although a wide variety of factors contribute to children’s literacy development, phonological awareness (i.e., the explicit knowledge of the sound structure of words) has consistently proven to be a critical factor in early literacy acquisition.
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