Speech, Language, and Hearing in Developing Bilingual Children Current Findings and Future Directions Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   July 01, 2005
Speech, Language, and Hearing in Developing Bilingual Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brian Goldstein
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
  • Kathryn Kohnert
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: briang@temple.edu
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Clinical Forum: Speech, Language, and Hearing in Bilingual Children
Clinical Forum   |   July 01, 2005
Speech, Language, and Hearing in Developing Bilingual Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2005, Vol. 36, 264-267. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2005/026)
History: Received March 24, 2005 , Accepted April 29, 2005
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2005, Vol. 36, 264-267. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2005/026)
History: Received March 24, 2005; Accepted April 29, 2005
Web of Science® Times Cited: 9
The purpose of this clinical forum on bilingualism was to present current research and clinical implications across a spectrum of bilingual learners and language domains. The number of individuals in North America (i.e., Canada and the United States) who speak a language in addition to English is increasing (Census of Canada, 2001; U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2000a). Given the prominence in the United States of individuals who speak Spanish in addition to English, it is not surprising that three of the articles (Bedore, Peña, Garcia, & Cortez; Goldstein, Fabiano, & Washington; and Nelson, Kohnert, Sabur, & Shaw) focused on Spanish—English bilingual children. In the United States, more than half of those reported to use a language other than English at home indicate Spanish as that other language (U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2000a). In addition to the studies including Spanish—English bilingual children, one article focused on Vietnamese bilingual children (Hwa-Froelich & Matsuo), and two articles (Paradis and Axmear, Reichle, Alamsaputra, Kohnert, Drager, & Sellnow) included children who spoke a variety of first languages—Arabic, Cantonese, Dari, Farsi, Hmong, Indonesean, Japanese, Korean, Mandarin, Romanian, Sudanese, and Ukranian. The final article, Kohnert, Yim, Nett, Kan, and Duran’s article on intervention, was applicable to all preschool-age children learning a language other than, or in addition to, the majority community language. These articles spanned a number of areas important to providing reliable and valid clinical services to bilingual children: morphosyntax (Paradis), semantics (Bedore, Peña, Garcia, & Cortez), phonology (Goldstein, Fabiano, & Washington), speech perception (Nelson, Kohnert, Sabur, & Shaw), synthesized speech intelligibility (Axmear, Reichle, Alamsaputra, Kohnert, Drager, & Sellnow), assessment (Hwa-Froelich and Matsuo), and intervention (Kohnert, Yim, Nett, Kan, & Duran).
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access