Intervention With Linguistically Diverse Preschool Children A Focus on Developing Home Language(s) Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   July 01, 2005
Intervention With Linguistically Diverse Preschool Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathryn Kohnert
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Dongsun Yim
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Kelly Nett
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Pui Fong Kan
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Lillian Duran
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: kohne005@umn.edu
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Clinical Forum: Speech, Language, and Hearing in Bilingual Children
Clinical Forum   |   July 01, 2005
Intervention With Linguistically Diverse Preschool Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2005, Vol. 36, 251-263. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2005/025)
History: Received October 7, 2004 , Accepted March 24, 2005
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2005, Vol. 36, 251-263. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2005/025)
History: Received October 7, 2004; Accepted March 24, 2005

Purpose: This article addresses a series of questions that are critical to planning and implementing effective intervention programs for young linguistically diverse learners with primary language impairment (LI). Linguistically diverse learners in the United States include children whose families speak languages such as Spanish, Korean, Cantonese, Hmong, Vietnamese, or any language other than, or in addition to, English.

Method: A narrative review of the relevant literature addresses clinical questions including (a) Why support the home language when it is not the language used in school or the majority community? (b) Does continued support for the home language undermine attainment in a second language? (c) Should we support the home language when it includes the code switching or mixing of two traditionally separate languages? and (d) What are some strategies that can be used to support the home language when it is a language that the speech-language pathologist (SLP) does not speak?

Conclusion: SLPs should provide services to linguistically diverse preschool-age children with LI in a manner that effectively supports the development of the home language. Parent and paraprofessional training along with peer-mediated models of intervention are presented as two possible methods for facilitating the home language in children with LI.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Funding for manuscript preparation was provided by Grant R03 DC05542 (titled Cognitive—Linguistic Processing in LI and L2 Learners) from the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders and from a McKnight Land-Grant Professorship awarded to the first author.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access