Vietnamese Children and Language-Based Processing Tasks Purpose: Vietnamese children’s performance on language-based processing tasks of fast-mapping (FM) word-learning and dynamic assessment (DA) word- and rule-learning tasks were investigated. Method: Twenty-one first- and second-generation Vietnamese preschool children participated in this study. All children were enrolled in 2 Head Start programs in a large city in the Midwest. ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   July 01, 2005
Vietnamese Children and Language-Based Processing Tasks
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Deborah A. Hwa-Froelich
    Saint Louis University, MO
  • Hisako Matsuo
    Saint Louis University, MO
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: hwafroda@slu.edu
Article Information
Development / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Forum: Speech, Language, and Hearing in Bilingual Children
Clinical Forum   |   July 01, 2005
Vietnamese Children and Language-Based Processing Tasks
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2005, Vol. 36, 230-243. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2005/023)
History: Received December 18, 2003 , Revised April 16, 2004 , Accepted October 5, 2004
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2005, Vol. 36, 230-243. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2005/023)
History: Received December 18, 2003; Revised April 16, 2004; Accepted October 5, 2004

Purpose: Vietnamese children’s performance on language-based processing tasks of fast-mapping (FM) word-learning and dynamic assessment (DA) word- and rule-learning tasks were investigated.

Method: Twenty-one first- and second-generation Vietnamese preschool children participated in this study. All children were enrolled in 2 Head Start programs in a large city in the Midwest. All children had passed a developmental assessment and routine speech, language, and hearing screenings. All participants were taught 4 invented monosyllabic words in an FM word task, an invented monosyllabic suffix rule (-po) meaning "a part of" in a DA rule task, and 4 invented bisyllabic words in a DA word task. Potential relationships among task performances were investigated. Receptive task performances, expressive task performances, and task totals were added to create receptive total, expressive total, and accumulated performance total (APT) scores. Relationships among receptive total, expressive total, and APT scores were also investigated.

Results: Significant correlations were found between FM word, DA rule, and the receptive total. The expressive total correlated with all task total scores, APT, age, and modifiability scores. Modifiability scores correlated with the two DA tasks, expressive total, and the APT. Findings indicate that FM word and the expressive total were positively correlated with most of the other tasks, composite totals, and age.

Clinical Implications: Performance on language-based processing tasks may provide valuable information for separating typically developing Vietnamese preschool children from their peers with language disorders. Practitioners should consider linguistic characteristics of target stimuli. Comparisons should include task, receptive, expressive, and APT.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors would like to express their gratitude to Miki Honda for her hours of dedicated effort on this project and to Carol Westby for her comments and suggestions. In addition, the authors are indebted to the children and Head Start staff who graciously allowed access to their classrooms and assisted with this project. This project was funded through the Saint Louis University 2000 Research Assistantship Award.
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