Clinical Forum: Speech, Language, and Hearing in Bilingual Children  |   July 2005
Classroom Noise and Children Learning Through a Second Language
 
Author Notes
Article Information
Development / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum: Speech, Language, and Hearing in Bilingual Children   |   July 2005
Classroom Noise and Children Learning Through a Second Language
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2005, Vol. 36, 219-229. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2005/022)
History: Received March 15, 2004 , Revised July 6, 2004 , Accepted October 22, 2004
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2005, Vol. 36, 219-229. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2005/022)
History: Received March 15, 2004; Revised July 6, 2004; Accepted October 22, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 17

Purpose: Two studies were conducted to investigate the effects of classroom noise on attention and speech perception in native Spanish-speaking second graders learning English as their second language (L2) as compared to English-only-speaking (EO) peers.

Method: Study 1 measured children's on-task behavior during instructional activities with and without soundfield amplification. Study 2 measured the effects of noise (+10 dB signal-to-noise ratio) using an experimental English word recognition task.

Results: Findings from Study 1 revealed no significant condition (pre/postamplification) or group differences in observations in on-task performance. Main findings from Study 2 were that word recognition performance declined significantly for both L2 and EO groups in the noise condition; however, the impact was disproportionately greater for the L2 group.

Clinical Implications: Children learning in their L2 appear to be at a distinct disadvantage when listening in rooms with typical noise and reverberation. Speech-language pathologists and audiologists should collaborate to inform teachers, help reduce classroom noise, increase signal levels, and improve access to spoken language for L2 learners.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access