Conceptual Versus Monolingual Scoring When Does It Make a Difference? Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   July 01, 2005
Conceptual Versus Monolingual Scoring
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa M. Bedore
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • Elizabeth D. Peña
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • Melissa García
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • Celina Cortez
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: lbedore@mail.utexas.edu
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Clinical Forum: Speech, Language, and Hearing in Bilingual Children
Clinical Forum   |   July 01, 2005
Conceptual Versus Monolingual Scoring
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2005, Vol. 36, 188-200. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2005/020)
History: Received December 8, 2003 , Revised March 19, 2004 , Accepted August 24, 2004
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2005, Vol. 36, 188-200. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2005/020)
History: Received December 8, 2003; Revised March 19, 2004; Accepted August 24, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 57

Purpose: This study evaluates the extent to which bilingual children produce the same or overlapping responses on tasks assessing semantic skills in each of their languages and whether classification analysis based on monolingual or conceptual scoring can accurately classify the semantic development of typically developing (TD) bilingual children.

Method: In Study 1, 55 TD children (ages 4;0 [years;months] to 7;11) from bilingual backgrounds named characteristic properties of familiar items. The extent to which children produced overlapping responses in each of their languages and their errors were examined. In Study 2, 40 TD children (ages 5;0 to 6;1), group matched for age and bilingual language exposure, responded to the Phase 2 version of the Bilingual English Spanish Assessment (BESA; E. D. Peña, V. Gutierrez-Clellen, A. Iglesias, B. A. Goldstein, & L. M. Bedore, in development). Conceptual and monolingual scores were compared to determine the extent to which these were comparable for groups of children.

Results: The results of Study 1 indicated that TD children from bilingual backgrounds are more likely to produce unique than overlapping responses when they respond to test items. Children were more likely to code switch when tested in Spanish than in English, but they were more likely to produce errors in English. In Study 2, monolingual and bilingual children achieved comparable conceptual scores. For Spanish-speaking bilingual children, the conceptual score was more likely to be in the average range of the monolingual children than was their monolingual score. For testing in English, monolingual and conceptual scores were similar.

Clinical Implications: Bilingual children will benefit from conceptual scoring, especially when they are tested in Spanish.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
This research was supported in part by Grant N01-DC-8-2100 from the National Institutes of Health (National Institute of Deafness and other Communication Disorders).
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