Speech, Language, and Hearing in Developing Bilingual Children From Practice to Research Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   July 01, 2005
Speech, Language, and Hearing in Developing Bilingual Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathryn Kohnert
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Brian Goldstein
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: kohne005@umn.edu
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Clinical Forum: Speech, Language, and Hearing in Bilingual Children
Clinical Forum   |   July 01, 2005
Speech, Language, and Hearing in Developing Bilingual Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2005, Vol. 36, 169-171. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2005/018)
History: Received March 24, 2005 , Accepted April 19, 2005
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2005, Vol. 36, 169-171. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2005/018)
History: Received March 24, 2005; Accepted April 19, 2005
Web of Science® Times Cited: 11
This clinical forum was designed to present current research on selected aspects of speech, language, and hearing in developing bilinguals. Developing bilinguals are defined here as those children who receive regular input in two or more languages during the most dynamic period of communication development—somewhere between birth and adolescence. Globally, developing bilinguals are the rule rather than the exception. Even in countries that were previously known for their relative monolingual or single-language status, the numbers of developing bilinguals are great and continue to climb. In the United States, for example, it is estimated that one in five children will speak a language other than, or in addition to, English by the year 2010 (U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2000). For speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and audiologists who work with children, reports of increasing linguistic diversity among the general population do not come as breaking news. These professionals have been at the front lines of demographic changes, armed with relatively little empirical research to guide their clinical interactions with developing bilinguals.
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