From the Editor... Brian A. Goldstein In reading research papers, we have become accustomed to statistical terms such as t tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA), p values, and significance. There is a relatively new statistical term, however, that might not be as familiar to readers—effect size. The imperative to report effect size came ... Editorial
Editorial  |   April 01, 2005
From the Editor...
 
Author Notes
Article Information
Editorial
Editorial   |   April 01, 2005
From the Editor...
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2005, Vol. 36, 91-92. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2005/008)
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2005, Vol. 36, 91-92. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2005/008)
Brian A. Goldstein
In reading research papers, we have become accustomed to statistical terms such as t tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA), p values, and significance. There is a relatively new statistical term, however, that might not be as familiar to readers—effect size. The imperative to report effect size came in 2001 with the publication of the fifth edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. This manual is the style guide to which all authors publishing in ASHA’s scholarly journals must conform. Before 2001, there were cases in which effect size was reported in LSHSS (e.g., Gillon, 2000), although this was the exception and not the rule.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access