Preschool Teachers’ Perceptions and Reactions to Challenging Classroom Behavior Implications for Speech-Language Pathologists Clinical Exchange
Clinical Exchange  |   April 01, 2005
Preschool Teachers’ Perceptions and Reactions to Challenging Classroom Behavior
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nicole R. Nungesser, MA
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Speech and Hearing Science, 901 South Sixth Street, Champaign, IL 61820
  • Ruth V. Watkins
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: nungesse@uiuc.edu
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Clinical Exchange
Clinical Exchange   |   April 01, 2005
Preschool Teachers’ Perceptions and Reactions to Challenging Classroom Behavior
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2005, Vol. 36, 139-151. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2005/013)
History: Received January 6, 2004 , Revised May 15, 2004 , Accepted December 22, 2004
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2005, Vol. 36, 139-151. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2005/013)
History: Received January 6, 2004; Revised May 15, 2004; Accepted December 22, 2004

Awareness of issues of social competence and challenging behavior related to childhood language and communication disorders has been increasing. The purpose of this clinical exchange is to provide speech-language pathologists with basic information on communication disorders and challenging behaviors, as well as with insights into ways to support both students and classroom teachers. To provide effective services to children with language impairments and optimally support classroom staff, speech-language pathologists need to recognize (a) the interdependence of language, communication, social competence, and challenging behaviors; (b) the significance that challenging behaviors can have on evaluations of academic competency; and (c) how teachers in early childhood classrooms perceive and react to challenging behaviors. This clinical exchange provides an overview of the relationship between language, communication, and social competence, and presents preliminary survey research data investigating teachers’ perceptions and reactions to challenging behaviors. Clinical implications are discussed, including considerations for intervention with children who may exhibit challenging behaviors in combination with language disabilities, and the speech-language pathologist’s instrumental role in educating and supporting classroom staff to use communication strategies when managing challenging classroom behaviors.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This research was funded in part by the University of Illinois Graduate College Thesis Grant. Preparation of the manuscript was supported by Grant H3250010009 (R. Watkins, PI) from the U.S. Department of Education.
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