Serving English Language Learners in Public School Settings A National Survey Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 2005
Serving English Language Learners in Public School Settings
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Celeste Roseberry-McKibbin
    California State University, Sacramento
    California State University, Sacramento, 6000 J Street, Sacramento, CA 95819-6071
  • Alejandro Brice
    University of Central Florida, Orlando
  • Laureen O’Hanlon
    California State University, Sacramento
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: celeste@csus.edu
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 2005
Serving English Language Learners in Public School Settings
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2005, Vol. 36, 48-61. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2005/005)
History: Received July 22, 2003 , Accepted March 26, 2004
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2005, Vol. 36, 48-61. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2005/005)
History: Received July 22, 2003; Accepted March 26, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 31

Purpose: In 1990, 1,145 public school speech-language pathologists (SLPs) across the United States were surveyed regarding service delivery to English language learner (ELL) students (C. A. Roseberry-McKibbin & G. E. Eicholtz, 1994). In 2001, the survey was replicated with a larger national sample (N = 1,736). The first purpose of the current study was to conduct an in-depth analysis of the 2001 survey results in terms of relationships between variables in respondents’ backgrounds (e.g., region of the United States and coursework in service delivery to ELL students) and perceived problems in providing service delivery to ELL students. The second purpose of the current study was to compare answers from the 1990 and 2001 surveys in terms of similarities and differences.

Method: Six thousand surveys were mailed out to a randomly and independently selected sample of public school SLPs across the United States. One thousand seven hundred thirty-six surveys were returned and analyzed.

Results: Results indicated both similarities and differences between answers from the 1990 and 2001 surveys. Results from an in-depth analysis of the current survey found that respondents from the West had the most coursework in service delivery to ELL students. Respondents from the West and the Southwest regions of the United States perceived all service delivery problems with ELL students as occurring less frequently than did their counterparts from other regions. Respondents with more university coursework perceived "lack of appropriate less biased assessment instruments" as a more frequently occurring problem than did respondents with less university coursework.

Clinical Implications: Universities need to offer coursework regarding service delivery to ELL students. A particularly important area that courses should address is less biased assessment of ELL students. Other implications and directions for future research are discussed.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This study was made possible in part by a grant from California State University, Sacramento’s Office of Research and Sponsored Projects. The study could not have been completed without the help of many diligent students and office staff who gave generously of their time and effort. Kristina Martin deserves special thanks for the many hours of work she dedicated to data input. Phyllis Carlburg, Laura Enos, and Letta Wesley merit special appreciation for the many hours they spent helping with data collection and analysis. We also thank Irene Bingham, Rebecca Bush, Jovona Diggs, Denise Dove, Kelly Gorman, Ginna Granger, Lorraine Hill, Paula Gannon, Annette Kauforous, Zahid Khan, Kripa Krishnan, Sarah Mattox, Suzanne May, Jenny Noma, Aaron Reese, Lisa Rikkers, Kara Schweitz, Jennifer Velasco-Cochrane, and Lorraine Willis for their time and assistance.
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