Use of a Parent Questionnaire in Emergent and Early Literacy Assessment of Preschool Children Purpose: The purpose of this project was to evaluate the use of a parent questionnaire in the assessment of emergent and early literacy skills of preschool children with language impairments (LI) and their typically developing (TD) peers to determine the relationship between parent report and more formal measures of early ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 2005
Use of a Parent Questionnaire in Emergent and Early Literacy Assessment of Preschool Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Donna Boudreau
    Speech and Hearing Sciences Program, Department of Communication, Portland State University, Portland, OR 97207-0751
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: boudreaud@pdx.edu
Article Information
Development / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Normal Language Processing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 2005
Use of a Parent Questionnaire in Emergent and Early Literacy Assessment of Preschool Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2005, Vol. 36, 33-47. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2005/004)
History: Received September 3, 2003 , Accepted March 19, 2004
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2005, Vol. 36, 33-47. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2005/004)
History: Received September 3, 2003; Accepted March 19, 2004

Purpose: The purpose of this project was to evaluate the use of a parent questionnaire in the assessment of emergent and early literacy skills of preschool children with language impairments (LI) and their typically developing (TD) peers to determine the relationship between parent report and more formal measures of early literacy, as well as to compare home literacy practices of these two groups of children.

Method: Preschool children with LI (n = 17) were referred by area school district speech-language pathologists, and age-matched peers (n = 20) were recruited from local preschools. Examiner-administered measures of early literacy included assessment of rhyme, knowledge of environmental print, knowledge of print conventions, and letter-name and letter-sound knowledge, as well as analyses of narrative abilities. The parent questionnaire included 31 closed questions with responses chosen on a 5-point scale that addressed a number of domains of knowledge: phonological awareness, response to print in the environment, alphabet knowledge, interactions around books, writing, orientation to literacy, and parent practices, in addition to a number of open-ended questions.

Results: Results revealed a strong relationship between examiner-administered measures of early literacy and parent report for the children with LI only. Parents of children with LI rated their children more poorly across domains of literacy knowledge than did parents of the comparison group. Finally, a comparison of home literacy practices found differences between the groups in time spent watching television, age parents began reading to the child, and number of books owned by the child.

Clinical Implications: Findings support the use of parent report as a tool in the assessment of emergent and early literacy knowledge and skills for children with LI.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The participation of parents and children in this project is greatly appreciated. Portions of this work were presented at the 1998 annual convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in San Antonio, TX.
Thank you to Allison Henning, whose master’s thesis contributed greatly to the literature review for this manuscript.
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