Laryngeal Structure and Function in the Pediatric Larynx Clinical Applications Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   October 01, 2004
Laryngeal Structure and Function in the Pediatric Larynx
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christine M. Sapienza, PhD
    University of Florida, 63 Dauer Hall, Gainesville, FL 32611
  • Bari Hoffman Ruddy
    University of Central Florida, Orlando
  • Susan Baker
    Miami University, Miami, OH
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: sapienza@csd.ufl.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Forum: Childhood Voice Disorders
Clinical Forum   |   October 01, 2004
Laryngeal Structure and Function in the Pediatric Larynx
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2004, Vol. 35, 299-307. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2004/029)
History: Received March 5, 2003 , Accepted September 18, 2003
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2004, Vol. 35, 299-307. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2004/029)
History: Received March 5, 2003; Accepted September 18, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 13

This article presents an overview of the normal anatomy and physiology of the pediatric larynx, followed by some examples of pediatric voice disorders that were chosen to exemplify the alterations to the laryngeal anatomy and the subsequent modifications to laryngeal function. Vocal fold nodules are primarily reviewed due to their high incidence in the pediatric population. Three other disorders, including laryngeal hyperfunction, unilateral vocal fold paralysis, and bilateral abductor vocal fold paralysis, are discussed because of their more common occurrence and the uniqueness of their etiology and intervention, particularly for the case of bilateral abductor vocal fold paralysis.

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