Epilogue: What Child Language Research May Contribute to the Understanding and Treatment of Stuttering This quote is a description of the difficulties faced by many persons who stutter (PWS) when speaking during their activities of daily living. Not being understood and not being able to say what one wants to say, when one wants to say it, must be extraordinarily frustrating. Although the individual ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   January 01, 2004
Epilogue: What Child Language Research May Contribute to the Understanding and Treatment of Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amy L. Weiss
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, 120B SHC, IA 52242-1012
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: amy-weiss@uiowa.edu
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Clinical Forum: Understanding and Treatment of Stuttering
Clinical Forum   |   January 01, 2004
Epilogue: What Child Language Research May Contribute to the Understanding and Treatment of Stuttering
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2004, Vol. 35, 90-92. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2004/010)
History: Received September 22, 2003 , Accepted September 25, 2003
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2004, Vol. 35, 90-92. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2004/010)
History: Received September 22, 2003; Accepted September 25, 2003
This quote is a description of the difficulties faced by many persons who stutter (PWS) when speaking during their activities of daily living. Not being understood and not being able to say what one wants to say, when one wants to say it, must be extraordinarily frustrating. Although the individual quoted is an adult, certainly children who stutter (CWS), experiencing disruptions in their fluent production of sentences, also recognize that their ability to participate in conversations may be compromised. Thus, for the speech-language pathologist (SLP), providing assessment and intervention for fluency disorders is not only about measuring the frequency and quality of the clients’ word and syllable repetitions, blocks, prolongations, and interrupted or “broken” words. In the big picture, stuttering is about having difficulty communicating. The SLP who works with PWS, whether adults or children, should have two focuses for therapy—the micro, or sentencelevel concerns of the manifestations of stuttering, and the macro, or discourse-level concerns of how disfluencies may influence successful communication. Thus, SLPs need not only to be knowledgeable about specific strategies and techniques to assist their clients in reducing the occurrence of their disfluencies or to stutter more fluently, but also to recognize how to ameliorate the reduction in communication finesse that their clients who stutter may experience.
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