Therapy Talk Analyzing Therapeutic Discourse Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   January 01, 2004
Therapy Talk
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Margaret M. Leahy
    Clinical Speech and Language Studies, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: mleahy@tcd.ie
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Normal Language Processing / Clinical Forum: Understanding and Treatment of Stuttering
Clinical Forum   |   January 01, 2004
Therapy Talk
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2004, Vol. 35, 70-81. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2004/008)
History: Received March 10, 2003 , Accepted July 6, 2003
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2004, Vol. 35, 70-81. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2004/008)
History: Received March 10, 2003; Accepted July 6, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 29

Therapeutic discourse is the talk-in-interaction that represents the social practice between clinician and client. This article invites speech-language pathologists to apply their knowledge of language to analyzing therapy talk and to learn how talking practices shape clinical roles and identities. A range of qualitative research approaches, including ethnography of communication, conversation analysis, and frame theory, provides a background for the case presentation of a 13-year-old girl who stutters. Asymmetry is a feature of the therapeutic discourse presented, with evidence of recognition of the client’s communicative competence emerging. Applications of analyzing therapy talk are discussed, illustrating the relevance of this approach for clinicians.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The author wishes to thank the following colleagues for their helpful comments on earlier drafts of the paper: T. Stewart; Y. C. Watanabe; S. Melijson; and especially, I. P. Walsh. Remaining deficiencies are the author’s sole responsibility.
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