Spontaneous and Imitated Productions in Spanish-Speaking Children With Phonological Disorders Purpose: Research examining the relationship between spontaneous and imitated productions for phonological analysis has indicated that the inclusion of imitated productions may overestimate children’s phonological abilities. Previous research in this area has included only English-speaking children. The purpose of this study was to determine what, if any, differences there were ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 2004
Spontaneous and Imitated Productions in Spanish-Speaking Children With Phonological Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brian Goldstein
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
  • Leah Fabiano
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
  • Aquiles Iglesias
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
  • Contact author: Brian Goldstein, Department of Communication Sciences, 109 Weiss Hall, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
    Contact author: Brian Goldstein, Department of Communication Sciences, 109 Weiss Hall, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: briang@temple.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 2004
Spontaneous and Imitated Productions in Spanish-Speaking Children With Phonological Disorders
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2004, Vol. 35, 5-15. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2004/002)
History: Received March 27, 2003 , Accepted July 15, 2003
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2004, Vol. 35, 5-15. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2004/002)
History: Received March 27, 2003; Accepted July 15, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 20

Purpose: Research examining the relationship between spontaneous and imitated productions for phonological analysis has indicated that the inclusion of imitated productions may overestimate children’s phonological abilities. Previous research in this area has included only English-speaking children. The purpose of this study was to determine what, if any, differences there were in the spontaneous and imitated productions of Spanish-speaking children with phonological disorders.

Method: Twelve Spanish-speaking children with phonological disorders (5 boys and 7 girls), ranging in age from 3;1 (years;months) to 4;9 (M=3;11), participated in the study. Their spontaneous and imitated productions, based on a sample of single words, were analyzed to determine which elicitation task yielded the more adult-like production. Differences in consonant accuracy between the two tasks were analyzed, as was the shift in error type from spontaneous to imitated productions.

Results: The results indicated that spontaneous and imitated productions were identical in 62% of the cases, an imitated production was more adult-like than a spontaneous one in 25% of the cases, and a spontaneous form was more adult-like than an imitated one in approximately 13% of the cases. Consonant accuracy for some children also varied as a function of elicitation task.

Clinical Implications: For additional diagnostic and prognostic value, speech-language pathologists can incorporate imitated responses in their analyses.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access