Why We Should Consider Pragmatics When Planning Treatment for Children Who Stutter Pragmatics, the use of language in context, has been investigated only recently in the language used by children who stutter (CWS). Historically, researchers compared the length and complexity of the syntactic constructions produced by these children with those of children who do not stutter (CWNS) and generally found the CWS ... Clinical Forum: Understanding and Treatment of Stuttering
Clinical Forum: Understanding and Treatment of Stuttering  |   January 2004
Why We Should Consider Pragmatics When Planning Treatment for Children Who Stutter
 
Author Notes
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: amy-weiss@uiowa.edu
  • © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum: Understanding and Treatment of Stuttering   |   January 2004
Why We Should Consider Pragmatics When Planning Treatment for Children Who Stutter
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2004, Vol. 35, 34-45. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2004/005)
History: Received September 30, 2002 , Accepted June 20, 2003
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2004, Vol. 35, 34-45. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2004/005)
History: Received September 30, 2002; Accepted June 20, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 6

Pragmatics, the use of language in context, has been investigated only recently in the language used by children who stutter (CWS). Historically, researchers compared the length and complexity of the syntactic constructions produced by these children with those of children who do not stutter (CWNS) and generally found the CWS to be relatively deficient. More recently, some investigators have begun to address how the language and fluency of CWS are influenced in different communicative settings. This article describes several findings concerning the pragmatic competencies of CWS set against the traditional framework of pragmatic language development. Most studies have shown no significant differences between the CWS and CWNS groups, although some aspects of pragmatic language use have yielded an exacerbation of stuttering for CWS. These findings have suggested specific ways of incorporating a pragmatic focus in the treatment programming for CWS where the degree of difficulty of language use is increased gradually.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access