Prologue: What Child Language Research May Contribute to the Understanding and Treatment of Stuttering According to the data available from the 2001 American Speech-Language-Hearing (ASHA) Omnibus Survey (Janota, 2001) investigating the caseloads of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) who are employed full time and working in a variety of settings including schools, just less than two thirds of all SLPs who completed the questionnaire (65.2%) regularly ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   January 01, 2004
Prologue: What Child Language Research May Contribute to the Understanding and Treatment of Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amy L. Weiss
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, 120B SHC, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1012
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: amy-weiss@uiowa.edu
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Clinical Forum: Understanding and Treatment of Stuttering
Clinical Forum   |   January 01, 2004
Prologue: What Child Language Research May Contribute to the Understanding and Treatment of Stuttering
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2004, Vol. 35, 30-33. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2004/004)
History: Received August 26, 2003 , Accepted September 3, 2003
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2004, Vol. 35, 30-33. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2004/004)
History: Received August 26, 2003; Accepted September 3, 2003
According to the data available from the 2001 American Speech-Language-Hearing (ASHA) Omnibus Survey (Janota, 2001) investigating the caseloads of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) who are employed full time and working in a variety of settings including schools, just less than two thirds of all SLPs who completed the questionnaire (65.2%) regularly provide speech therapy to individuals with fluency disorders. This percentage represents an average of 2.4 clients per clinician. More specifically, for SLPs employed in the schools, the numbers are somewhat higher, with 78.3% of clinicians reporting individuals who stutter on their caseloads, representing an average of 2.5 clients per clinician’s caseload. Although these numbers do not speak to extraordinarily high proportions of our school clientele as presenting with fluency disorders, they do suggest that an appreciable majority of school-based clinicians are called on to provide speech or speech-language services to some children who stutter (CWS).
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