Speech-Language Pathologists’ Opinions on Communication Disorders and Violence Purpose: This study investigated the opinions of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) regarding their role, education, and training in serving students with communication disorders who have been involved in violence. Method: A survey consisting of 26 items was given to 598 SLPs from eight states representing geographic regions of the United States. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 2004
Speech-Language Pathologists’ Opinions on Communication Disorders and Violence
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dixie Sanger, PhD
    University of Nebraska—Lincoln
    University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Barbara J. Moore-Brown
    El Rancho Unified School District, Pico Rivera, CA
  • Judy Montgomery
    Chapman University, Orange, CA
  • Susan Hellerich
    University of Nebraska—Lincoln
  • Contact author: Dixie Sanger, PhD, 318 Barkley Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583-0738.
    Contact author: Dixie Sanger, PhD, 318 Barkley Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583-0738.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: dsanger@unlinfo.unl.edu
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 2004
Speech-Language Pathologists’ Opinions on Communication Disorders and Violence
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2004, Vol. 35, 16-29. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2004/003)
History: Received February 14, 2003 , Accepted July 6, 2003
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2004, Vol. 35, 16-29. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2004/003)
History: Received February 14, 2003; Accepted July 6, 2003

Purpose: This study investigated the opinions of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) regarding their role, education, and training in serving students with communication disorders who have been involved in violence.

Method: A survey consisting of 26 items was given to 598 SLPs from eight states representing geographic regions of the United States.

Results: Participants acknowledged that violence is an increasing concern. They also recognized the valuable role they have in planning prevention programs and serving on multidisciplinary teams. In contrast, SLPs’ opinions suggested that they did not feel well trained to deal with violence, nor did they feel that the role of communication in violence was understood by SLPs or educators. Comparisons between SLPs from different school and nonschool settings on their education and training and their role in serving this population were not significant. Participants with violence education and training responded significantly more favorably than those without such education and training on planning prevention programs; contributing important information to multidisciplinary teams in planning programs; and the impact of intervention on academics, behavior, and social interactions. Statistically significant findings indicated that both groups disagreed on understanding the role of communication in violence and being trained to provide services. However, findings need to be interpreted cautiously because both groups’ means fell within the same categories of agreement/disagreement, and actual differences between groups were small. Quantitative and qualitative findings revealed that education and training are prevalent concerns of SLPs. Their written feedback suggested that SLPs provide critical information as we plan for this population.

Clinical Implications: Additional education and training are needed in areas such as the role of the SLP in communication and violence, intervention that addresses behavior management, and multicultural issues.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors would like to thank Michelle Moser for her assistance with data collection as well as Samantha Corbridge and Anne Dredla for helping with data entry of this manuscript. We are appreciative of the statistical data consultation from Kathy Shapley and Tzu-Yun Chin at the NEAR Center. Finally, without the participation of the 598 speech-language pathologists, this study would not have been possible. Thank you for your time and valuable contributions!
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access