The Relative Importance of Selected Communication Skills for Adolescents’ Interactions With Their Teachers High School Teachers’ Opinions Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2003
The Relative Importance of Selected Communication Skills for Adolescents’ Interactions With Their Teachers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Vicki A. Reed
    The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Lynette Spicer
    The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Currently affiliated with Wentworth Area Community Child and Family Health Services, Sydney, Australia.
    Currently affiliated with Wentworth Area Community Child and Family Health Services, Sydney, Australia.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: V.Reed@fhs.usyd.edu.au
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2003
The Relative Importance of Selected Communication Skills for Adolescents’ Interactions With Their Teachers
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2003, Vol. 34, 343-357. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2003/028)
History: Received October 11, 2002 , Accepted July 23, 2003
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2003, Vol. 34, 343-357. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2003/028)
History: Received October 11, 2002; Accepted July 23, 2003

Purpose: This study investigated the opinions of high school teachers regarding the relative importance of selected communication skills for their students’ communication with them and explored if the content areas in which the teachers taught or the amount of high school teaching experience they had were associated with their opinions.

Method: Teachers ranked 14 communication skills according to perceived order of importance for Grade 10 adolescents’ communication with them as teachers.

Results: Teachers tended to perceive skills associated with discourse management strategies as relatively more important than other skills. The two communication skills that were associated with metalinguistic/figurative language aspects of communication were ranked as least important. Inexperienced and experienced high school teachers tended to rank the importance of the communication skills similarly, as did sciences and humanities teachers, except for the communication skill of turn taking, which sciences teachers ranked higher than humanities teachers.

Clinical Implications: The results provide guidelines for developing intervention approaches that can facilitate successful communicative interactions in high school environments and target goals that teachers of adolescents with language and/or learning disabilities perceive as more important for teacher-adolescent interactions.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This study was based on an honors thesis that was completed by the second author in the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders at The University of Sydney. A part of the data for this study was presented at the annual conference of the Speech Pathology Association of Australia in May 1998 and in the proceedings of that conference. Sincere appreciation is extended to the teachers and principals of the high schools who participated in the study and to Lindy McAllister for her useful comments on aspects of the research.
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