"What Isn't Language?" A Qualitative Study of the Role of the School Speech-Language Pathologist Report
Report  |   October 2003
"What Isn't Language?"
 
Author Notes
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: tukraine@uwyo.edu
  • © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice
Report   |   October 2003
"What Isn't Language?"
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2003, Vol. 34, 284-298. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2003/024)
History: Received July 15, 2002 , Accepted June 16, 2003
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2003, Vol. 34, 284-298. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2003/024)
History: Received July 15, 2002; Accepted June 16, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 10

Purpose: This study examined how speech-language pathologists (SLPs) carry out their roles in the schools. The focus was on language as a domain of specialization and roles relative to other remedial educators.

Method:The study was a qualitative constant-comparative design. Five Wyoming school SLPs and 15 teachers from their five schools participated.

Results: Results showed that language was difficult to define and delimit. Language was present throughout the curriculum and all of the educators taught it. The SLPs and resource teachers demonstrated similar types of language instruction. Oral language and speech were clearly specialty domains of the SLPs. The SLPs were also distinctive in terms of the instructional framework and service delivery structure.

Implications: The findings contribute to understanding the role of SLPs in the schools and how these roles complement and overlap with other remedial educators.

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