From the Editor& Ruth Huntley Bahr “Practice has a logic which is not that of the logician.” (Pierre Bourdieu, French sociologist) All of us have preferences in the way we treat particular disorders. We have a tendency to use approaches that we feel are based on scientific knowledge and often have been ... Editorial
Editorial  |   July 01, 2003
From the Editor&
 
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Article Information
Editorial
Editorial   |   July 01, 2003
From the Editor&
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2003, Vol. 34, 175. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3403.175
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2003, Vol. 34, 175. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3403.175
Ruth Huntley Bahr
“Practice has a logic which is not that of the logician.”
(Pierre Bourdieu, French sociologist)
All of us have preferences in the way we treat particular disorders. We have a tendency to use approaches that we feel are based on scientific knowledge and often have been tested with our past clinical experiences (Kamhi, 1999). Apel (1999a)  urged clinicians to use theory to guide practice because we need to understand why things work—this is the foundation of evidence-based practice. In addition, our consumers and third-party payers are beginning to demand such information. However, to accomplish this goal, clinicians and researchers will have to work together, identifying the practices that need to be examined and systematically investigating practice in an attempt to uncover the “logic” that is described in the quote above.
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