Relationship Between Verbal Working Memory and the SCAN–C in Children With Specific Language Impairment Purpose An ongoing concern with the evaluation of auditory processing disorders is the extent that assessment instruments are influenced by higher order cognitive functions. This study examined the relationship between verbal working memory and performance on the Test for Auditory Processing Disorders in Children—Revised (SCAN–C; Keith, 2000b) in children with ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2010
Relationship Between Verbal Working Memory and the SCAN–C in Children With Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jarrad A. G. Lum
    Deakin University, Victoria, Australia
  • Michelle Zarafa
    Deakin University, Victoria, Australia
  • Contact author: Jarrad A. G. Lum, School of Psychology, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria, 3217, Australia. E-mail: jarrad.lum@deakin.edu.au.
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2010
Relationship Between Verbal Working Memory and the SCAN–C in Children With Specific Language Impairment
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2010, Vol. 41, 521-530. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2010/09-0035)
History: Received May 27, 2009 , Revised December 16, 2009 , Accepted March 13, 2010
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2010, Vol. 41, 521-530. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2010/09-0035)
History: Received May 27, 2009; Revised December 16, 2009; Accepted March 13, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose An ongoing concern with the evaluation of auditory processing disorders is the extent that assessment instruments are influenced by higher order cognitive functions. This study examined the relationship between verbal working memory and performance on the Test for Auditory Processing Disorders in Children—Revised (SCAN–C; Keith, 2000b) in children with specific language impairment (SLI) and typically developing (TD) children.

Method Sixteen children with SLI and 16 TD children ages 8½ to 11 years participated in the study. The children were presented with the SCAN–C and tests measuring verbal working memory.

Results Initial comparisons revealed that the SLI group obtained significantly lower scores than the TD group on the SCAN–C. However, after controlling for verbal working memory, significant differences between the 2 groups were no longer observed. Correlational analyses revealed that the composite score from the SCAN–C was related to all tests assessing verbal working memory.

Conclusions Performance on the SCAN–C may be related to working memory functioning. As a consequence, it is unclear whether difficulty on this task should be viewed as a problem with auditory processing or a problem with verbal working memory.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
We would like to thank all of the children and schools who participated in this research as well as Evan Kidd for his constructive feedback on an earlier version of the manuscript.
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