Written Language Disorders: Speech-Language Pathologists' Training, Knowledge, and Confidence Purpose This study examined speech-language pathologists' (SLPs') perceptions of their (a) educational and clinical training in evaluating and treating written language disorders, (b) knowledge bases in this area, (c) sources of knowledge about written language disorders, (d) confidence levels, and (e) predictors of confidence in working with written language disorders. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2010
Written Language Disorders: Speech-Language Pathologists' Training, Knowledge, and Confidence
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gordon W. Blood
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Callie Mamett
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Rebecca Gordon
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Ingrid M. Blood
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Contact author: Gordon W. Blood, The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 308 Ford Building, University Park, PA 16802. E-mail: f2x@psu.edu.
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Normal Language Processing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2010
Written Language Disorders: Speech-Language Pathologists' Training, Knowledge, and Confidence
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2010, Vol. 41, 416-428. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2009/09-0032)
History: Received May 19, 2009 , Revised August 7, 2009 , Accepted October 17, 2009
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2010, Vol. 41, 416-428. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2009/09-0032)
History: Received May 19, 2009; Revised August 7, 2009; Accepted October 17, 2009
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

Purpose This study examined speech-language pathologists' (SLPs') perceptions of their (a) educational and clinical training in evaluating and treating written language disorders, (b) knowledge bases in this area, (c) sources of knowledge about written language disorders, (d) confidence levels, and (e) predictors of confidence in working with written language disorders.

Method A 6-part survey was developed and was mailed to 1,000 school-based SLPs.

Results SLPs (n = 599) practicing in 47 states responded to the survey. A majority (60.3%) reported working with a child with a written language disorder either weekly or daily. SLPs described their educational and clinical training as “limited” in the evaluation and treatment of children with written language disorders. The average SLP stated feeling “somewhat confident” to evaluate and treat written language disorders, and 63.8% reported that they received most of their knowledge through “on-the job” training. Confidence was related to four variables: on-the-job training, general knowledge about written language disorders, attendance at conventions, and understanding of collaborative efforts.

Conclusion Our findings provide information about SLPs' training, knowledge, and confidence about written language beyond anecdotal reports and fill research gaps regarding SLPs' preservice and professional development needs. Predictors of confidence are discussed.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access