Young Children’s Letter-Sound Knowledge Purpose: This study compares three essential skills in early literacy: letter-sound recognition, letter-sound recall, and letter reproduction. Previous research comparing these aspects of letter-sound knowledge is limited. Method: Eighty-three normally developing children between the ages of 4:11 (years:months) and 6:4 were asked to recognize (i.e., point to the appropriate letter ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2003
Young Children’s Letter-Sound Knowledge
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barbara Dodd
    University of Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom
  • Alex Carr
    University of Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom
  • Contact author: Barbara Dodd, School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences, King George VI Building, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU.
    Contact author: Barbara Dodd, School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences, King George VI Building, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: b.j.dodd@newcastle.ac.uk
Article Information
Development / Normal Language Processing / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2003
Young Children’s Letter-Sound Knowledge
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2003, Vol. 34, 128-137. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2003/011)
History: Received November 25, 2002 , Accepted January 29, 2003
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2003, Vol. 34, 128-137. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2003/011)
History: Received November 25, 2002; Accepted January 29, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 15

Purpose: This study compares three essential skills in early literacy: letter-sound recognition, letter-sound recall, and letter reproduction. Previous research comparing these aspects of letter-sound knowledge is limited.

Method: Eighty-three normally developing children between the ages of 4:11 (years:months) and 6:4 were asked to recognize (i.e., point to the appropriate letter when the letter’s sound is given), recall (i.e., say the letter’s sound), and reproduce (i.e., write the letter when the letter’s sound is given) 32 letter sounds.

Results: The children performed better in letter-sound recognition than in letter-sound recall, and better in letter-sound recall than in letter reproduction. Girls performed no differently from boys. Younger children performed as well as older children. Socioeconomic status had significant influence on the level of development for all tasks.

Clinical Implications: Clinicians and educators need to be aware of the different aspects of letter-sound knowledge development and how it can be assessed so that intervention can follow the normal developmental sequence of acquisition.

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