Prologue: Toward an Understanding of Literacy Issues in Multicultural School-Age Populations Any lingering questions about the role of speech-language pathologists as participants in the literacy education of school-age children have been clearly and succinctly answered by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) position statement, Roles and Responsibilities of Speech-Language Pa thologists With Respect to Reading and Writing in Children and Adolescents (2001). ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   January 01, 2003
Prologue: Toward an Understanding of Literacy Issues in Multicultural School-Age Populations
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joyce L. Harris
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • Contact author: Joyce L. Harris, PhD, The University of Texas at Austin, A1100, Austin, TX 78712.
    Contact author: Joyce L. Harris, PhD, The University of Texas at Austin, A1100, Austin, TX 78712.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: joyceharris@mail.utexas.edu
Article Information
Development / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Clinical Forum: Literacy Issues in Multicultural Populations
Clinical Forum   |   January 01, 2003
Prologue: Toward an Understanding of Literacy Issues in Multicultural School-Age Populations
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2003, Vol. 34, 17-19. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2003/002)
History: Received October 25, 2002 , Accepted October 28, 2002
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2003, Vol. 34, 17-19. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2003/002)
History: Received October 25, 2002; Accepted October 28, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3
Any lingering questions about the role of speech-language pathologists as participants in the literacy education of school-age children have been clearly and succinctly answered by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) position statement, Roles and Responsibilities of Speech-Language Pa thologists With Respect to Reading and Writing in Children and Adolescents (2001). Included in this document is a reminder of the inextricable link between spoken and written language, as evidenced by their respective hierarchical and reciprocal relationships. This same document highlights the ongoing interdependency of these communicative abilities across early development and adolescence (e.g., see Apel & Swank, 1999) into adulthood (Harris, 2001). Perhaps the best demonstration of the link between spoken and written language is the recognition that the same children who have problems with spoken language also have problems with reading and writing and, not surprisingly, vice versa. It follows that effective language interventions, whether focused on spoken or written language, exert reciprocally positive influences.
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