Translucency and Complexity Effects on Blissymbol Learning Using Computer and Teacher Presentations Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2002
Translucency and Complexity
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Orit E. Hetzroni
    University of Haifa, Israel
  • Raymond W. Quist
    Indiana State University, Terre Haute
  • Lyle L. Lloyd
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Contact author: Orit E. Hetzroni, Department of Education, Faculty of Education, University of Haifa, Mount Carmel, Haifa, 31905.
    Contact author: Orit E. Hetzroni, Department of Education, Faculty of Education, University of Haifa, Mount Carmel, Haifa, 31905.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: Hetzroni@construct.haifa.ac.il
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2002
Translucency and Complexity
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2002, Vol. 33, 291-303. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2002/024)
History: Received October 1, 2001 , Accepted July 30, 2002
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2002, Vol. 33, 291-303. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2002/024)
History: Received October 1, 2001; Accepted July 30, 2002

Purpose: A single-subject alternating treatment design was used to (a) evaluate the influence of translucency (i.e., the guessability of the symbol when the referent is known) and complexity (i.e., the number of lines or strokes that compose the symbol) on Blissymbol acquisition and (b) compare the effectiveness of computer-based instruction (CBI) and traditional teacher-based instruction (TBI) on students' accuracy in identifying Blissymbols.

Method: Three students with communication disorders were taught to identify 40 Blissymbols using the two instructional formats.

Results: Findings revealed that high translucency Blissymbols were learned significantly faster than low translucency Blissymbols for all participants. High complexity assisted learning when translucency was high, but hindered learning when translucency was low. These results were evident in both interventions.

Clinical Implications: Both interventions were found to be effective instructional methods for teaching Blissymbols.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
We extend sincere thanks to Marje Snow, her staff, and the children for all their help during the project. We would also like to extend our thanks to the Purdue AAC Group for their remarks on early versions of this study and to Dr. Philip Belfiore for his help during the development of the design stages.
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