Predicting Job Satisfaction Among Speech-Language Pathologists Working in Public Schools Purpose: The aims of the present study were (a) to compare the job satisfaction ratings of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) working in schools with other workers on a standardized index and (b) to examine whether geographic setting (i.e., rural, suburban, and urban), specific demographic variables (i.e., gender, ethnicity, age, and education), ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2002
Predicting Job Satisfaction Among Speech-Language Pathologists Working in Public Schools
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gordon W. Blood
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Jenna Swavely Ridenour
    Lancaster-Lebanon Public Schools, Lancaster, PA
  • Emily A. Thomas
    Bi-County Educational Collaborative, Wrentham, MA
  • Constance Dean Qualls
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Carol Scheffner Hammer
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Contact author: Gordon W. Blood, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 110 Moore Building, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802.
    Contact author: Gordon W. Blood, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 110 Moore Building, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: f2x@psu.edu
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2002
Predicting Job Satisfaction Among Speech-Language Pathologists Working in Public Schools
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2002, Vol. 33, 282-290. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2002/023)
History: Received March 24, 2002 , Accepted July 30, 2002
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2002, Vol. 33, 282-290. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2002/023)
History: Received March 24, 2002; Accepted July 30, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 18

Purpose: The aims of the present study were (a) to compare the job satisfaction ratings of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) working in schools with other workers on a standardized index and (b) to examine whether geographic setting (i.e., rural, suburban, and urban), specific demographic variables (i.e., gender, ethnicity, age, and education), and practice-related variables (i.e., years in current position and caseload size) explain/predict job satisfaction among SLPs working in public schools.

Method: A mail survey methodology was employed. Two thousand practicing SLPs, members of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), residing in the United States were randomly selected from the national membership list. Usable responses were obtained from 1,207 SLPs, representing a 60.4% response rate. Participants completed the Job Satisfaction Survey (Spector, 1996), demographic and practice-related questions, and information regarding their geographic work setting.

Results: These results suggest that the majority of SLPs are generally satisfied (42.2%) or highly satisfied (34.1%) with their jobs. Results of the regression analyses revealed that the age of participants (i.e., older were more satisfied), years at current job (i.e., SLPs with greater number of years were more satisfied), and caseload size (i.e., SLPs with smaller caseloads were more satisfied) were predictive of job satisfaction in SLPs working in the schools.

Clinical Implications: The findings provide additional assurance for SLPs concerning overall group satisfaction. The information could also assist educational training programs with data concerning SLPs' satisfaction. Smaller caseload size is predictive of job satisfaction. There were no differences among rural, suburban, and urban SLPs in their overall job satisfaction. This information could be useful for personnel directors in recruiting and retaining SLPs.

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