Communication Intervention for Children With Cochlear Implants Two Case Studies Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   July 01, 2002
Communication Intervention for Children With Cochlear Implants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David J. Ertmer, PhD
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Jeanette S. Leonard
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Michael L. Pachuilo
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Author contact: David J. Ertmer, PhD, Audiology and Speech Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1353.
    Author contact: David J. Ertmer, PhD, Audiology and Speech Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1353.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: dertmer@purdue.edu
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Forum: Oral Communication in Children With Cochlear Implants
Clinical Forum   |   July 01, 2002
Communication Intervention for Children With Cochlear Implants
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2002, Vol. 33, 205-217. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2002/018)
History: Received March 8, 2001 , Accepted February 27, 2002
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2002, Vol. 33, 205-217. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2002/018)
History: Received March 8, 2001; Accepted February 27, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 15

This article describes the intervention programs attended and progress made by 2 children who exhibited considerable differences in benefit from their cochlear implants. The children differed in many ways, including age at onset of deafness, preimplantation communications skills, age at implantation, the amount and types of intervention services received, and the rate at which they developed oral communication skills. Their intervention programs employed both analytical and synthetic auditory training and emphasized the development of speech production and language skills. These case studies help to illustrate the range of outcomes among cochlear implant recipients and the adaptability needed to design and implement individualized intervention programs.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Portions of this work were supported through NIDCD grant 1R03DC04226-02. Some of the test scores cited in this article were obtained from the DeVault Otologic Research Laboratory, Riley Children’s Hospital, Indianapolis, IN. Research at that facility was funded through grants from the NIH and NIDCD (R01 DC00064 and R01 DC00423).
We gratefully acknowledge the efforts of the graduate students who provided intervention for Bobby; Jennifer Mellon and Claire Johnson for their assistance in data analysis; and Carol Burklow and Amy Myers for providing information and insight about Drew’s educational programs. We are especially indebted to both children and their parents for participating in this project.
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