Vocal Development in Young Children With Cochlear Implants Profiles and Implications for Intervention Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   July 01, 2002
Vocal Development in Young Children With Cochlear Implants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David J. Ertmer, PhD
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Nancy Young
    Children’s Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL
  • Kristine Grohne
    Children’s Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL
  • Jennifer A. Mellon
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Claire Johnson
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Kristin Corbett
    Private Practice, Chicago, IL
  • Kathy Saindon
    Private Practice, Kankakee, IL
  • Author contact: David J. Ertmer, PhD, Audiology and Speech Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907–1353.
    Author contact: David J. Ertmer, PhD, Audiology and Speech Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907–1353.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: dertmer@purdue.edu
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Forum: Oral Communication in Children With Cochlear Implants
Clinical Forum   |   July 01, 2002
Vocal Development in Young Children With Cochlear Implants
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2002, Vol. 33, 184-195. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2002/016)
History: Received August 30, 2001 , Accepted March 28, 2002
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2002, Vol. 33, 184-195. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2002/016)
History: Received August 30, 2001; Accepted March 28, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 17

Purpose: This article describes prelinguistic vocal development in 2 prelingually deaf children who received multichannel cochlear implants at 10 and 28 months of age, respectively.

Methods: Vocalizations were recorded in half-hour mother- child interactions before and after implantation and then classified into three levels of development: precanonical, canonical, and postcanonical.

Results: One child made rapid progress in vocal development after her implant was activated. The other child showed slower progress with continued dominance of precanonical vocalizations throughout the first year of implant experience. Increases in vowel, diphthong, and consonant diversity; the establishment of canonical vocalizations; and the emergence of postcanonical forms were found to be indicators of progress in vocal development.

Clinical Implications: Observed differences in the rate and completeness of vocal development between the 2 children suggest that some young implant recipients may need specialized intervention strategies to stimulate speech development. The rationale and procedures for implementing Short Periods of Prelinguistic Input (SPPI), a potentially useful approach for stimulating vocal development, are presented.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This work was supported through a grant to the first author from the National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders (1R03DC04226-02). The Web site, Vocaldevelopment.com, was developed through a grant from the Multimedia Instructional Development Center at Purdue University. We are very grateful to the participating children’s families for their continued support of this project. Thanks also to Hope Gulker for her comments and suggestions regarding an earlier draft of this manuscript.
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