School-Based Services for Children With Cochlear Implants School-based speech, language, and hearing professionals are instrumental in the provision of rehabilitative, consultative, and support services for children with cochlear implants. This article reviews current candidacy requirements as well as factors that are considered when a child is evaluated for a cochlear implant. Following implantation, school professionals play a ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   July 01, 2002
School-Based Services for Children With Cochlear Implants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Holly F. B. Teagle
    The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City
  • Jan A. Moore
    The University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Currently affiliated with the University of Texas at Austin.
    Currently affiliated with the University of Texas at Austin.×
  • Author contact: Holly F. B. Teagle, Department of Otolaryngology, University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics, Iowa City, IA.
    Author contact: Holly F. B. Teagle, Department of Otolaryngology, University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics, Iowa City, IA.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: holly-teagle@uiowa.edu
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / School-Based Settings / Clinical Forum: Oral Communication in Children With Cochlear Implants
Clinical Forum   |   July 01, 2002
School-Based Services for Children With Cochlear Implants
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2002, Vol. 33, 162-171. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2002/014)
History: Received March 10, 2002 , Accepted April 29, 2002
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2002, Vol. 33, 162-171. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2002/014)
History: Received March 10, 2002; Accepted April 29, 2002

School-based speech, language, and hearing professionals are instrumental in the provision of rehabilitative, consultative, and support services for children with cochlear implants. This article reviews current candidacy requirements as well as factors that are considered when a child is evaluated for a cochlear implant. Following implantation, school professionals play a pivotal role in providing an appropriate educational program that should include auditory training and the integration of listening into the child’s daily routine. The article presents procedures for maintaining and troubleshooting the device, and suggestions for establishing routines for device use and for improving the listening environment for children in classrooms.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The Children’s Cochlear Implant Program is an ongoing project at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics Department of Otolaryngology. The project is supported by NIDCD-NIH 2 P50 DC 00242, NIH RR00059, Lions Club International Foundation, and the Iowa Lions Sight and Hearing Foundation.
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