An Introduction to Cochlear Implant Technology, Activation, and Programming Over the last decade, cochlear implantation has become an increasingly viable alternative for the treatment of profound sensorineural hearing loss in children. Although speech and hearing professionals play an important role in the communicative, social, and academic development of children with cochlear implants, many may be unfamiliar with recent advances ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   July 01, 2002
An Introduction to Cochlear Implant Technology, Activation, and Programming
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jan A. Moore
    The University of Iowa, Iowa City
    Assistant Professor
  • Holly F. B. Teagle
    The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City
  • Currently affiliated with the University of Texas at Austin.
    Currently affiliated with the University of Texas at Austin.×
  • Author contact: Jan Allison Moore, Assistant Professor, Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, Jesse Jones Communication Center A2.200, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712.
    Author contact: Jan Allison Moore, Assistant Professor, Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, Jesse Jones Communication Center A2.200, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: jan-moore@mail.utexas.edu
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Clinical Forum: Oral Communication in Children With Cochlear Implants
Clinical Forum   |   July 01, 2002
An Introduction to Cochlear Implant Technology, Activation, and Programming
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2002, Vol. 33, 153-161. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2002/013)
History: Received March 7, 2002 , Accepted May 2, 2002
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2002, Vol. 33, 153-161. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2002/013)
History: Received March 7, 2002; Accepted May 2, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Over the last decade, cochlear implantation has become an increasingly viable alternative for the treatment of profound sensorineural hearing loss in children. Although speech and hearing professionals play an important role in the communicative, social, and academic development of children with cochlear implants, many may be unfamiliar with recent advances in implant technology. This article provides an overview of the components of cochlear implant systems and the speech processing strategies that are currently being used by toddlers, preschoolers, and school-age children. A brief description of cochlear implant surgery and the procedures for programming these devices are also included. Finally, information regarding the use of assistive listening technology in the classroom is presented.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The Children’s Cochlear Implant Program is an ongoing project at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics Department of Otolaryngology. The project is supported by NIDCD-NIH 2 P50 DC 00242, NIH RR00059, Lions Club International Foundation, and the Iowa Lions Sight and Hearing Foundation.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access