Designing and Implementing an Early Literacy Screening Protocol Suggestions for the Speech-Language Pathologist Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2002
Designing and Implementing an Early Literacy Screening Protocol
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laura M. Justice
    University of Virginia, Charlottesville
  • Marcia A. Invernizzi
    University of Virginia, Charlottesville
  • Joanne D. Meier
    University of Virginia, Charlottesville
  • Contact author: Laura Justice, Communication Disorders Program, University of Virginia, 2205 Fontaine Avenue, Suite 202, Charlottesville, VA 22903.
    Contact author: Laura Justice, Communication Disorders Program, University of Virginia, 2205 Fontaine Avenue, Suite 202, Charlottesville, VA 22903.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: lmj2t@virginia.edu
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2002
Designing and Implementing an Early Literacy Screening Protocol
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2002, Vol. 33, 84-101. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2002/007)
History: Received October 4, 2001 , Accepted January 24, 2002
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2002, Vol. 33, 84-101. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2002/007)
History: Received October 4, 2001; Accepted January 24, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 35

The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (2001) recently asserted that speech-language pathologists can and should play an important role in promoting literacy for young children with communicative impairments. Early literacy screening provides a valuable tool for speech-language pathologists to use for the timely detection of difficulties in literacy achievement. In addition, results of early literacy screening can be used to guide intervention and instruction. This article provides a rationale for incorporating early literacy screening into service delivery. It also makes recommendations for determining which children and what areas of literacy should be targeted in screening activities. Suggestions for interpreting findings are also provided, as are strategies for using screening to guide early literacy intervention.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors would like to express sincere gratitude to the following individuals, all of whom provided constructive advice during the preparation of this manuscript: Heather Partridge, Terri Purcell, Randall Robey, Aimee Sullivan, and Jodi Welsch. The authors would also like to thank Ruth Huntley Bahr, Patricia Prelock, Anne van Kleeck, Lisa Hammett, and two anonymous reviewers, all of whom provided comments that were tremendously helpful in reconceptualizing specific aspects of this work.
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