The Transition Process in the Early Years Enhancing Speech-Language Pathologists’ Perspectives Clinical Exchange
Clinical Exchange  |   April 01, 2002
The Transition Process in the Early Years
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jo-Anne Prendeville, EdD
    University of Cincinnati, OH
  • Jane Ross-Allen
    University of Vermont, Burlington
  • Contact author: Jo-Anne Prendeville, EdD, 7158 Andersonwoods Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45244.
    Contact author: Jo-Anne Prendeville, EdD, 7158 Andersonwoods Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45244.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: joanne.prendeville@uc.edu
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Clinical Exchange
Clinical Exchange   |   April 01, 2002
The Transition Process in the Early Years
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2002, Vol. 33, 130-136. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2002/011)
History: Received February 12, 2001 , Accepted December 11, 2001
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2002, Vol. 33, 130-136. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2002/011)
History: Received February 12, 2001; Accepted December 11, 2001

The purpose of this clinical exchange is to provide speech-language pathologists with the basic information needed to participate as active, informed, and effective members of transition teams. A speech-language pathologist’s role of bridging language and curriculum across the grades creates a unique opportunity to bring meaningful contributions to the transition process. Typical speech-language pathology preparation does not focus on the specifics of the transition process. This article provides speech-language pathologists, as well as families and other professionals, with information pertaining to transitions in the early years, particularly between preschool settings and kindergarten. Expertise in the transition process is necessary for effective participation and implementation. This article will highlight challenges in transition and delineate specific components of transition planning. The article will conclude with a set of best practices that can provide the foundation of a model for early transitions.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This article was developed through the support of two U.S. Department of Education grants, an Office of Special Education grant, H029G60249, a personnel preparation grant at the University of Cincinnati, and H324R980097, an outreach grant at the University of Vermont. The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the position of the U.S. Department of Education and no official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education should be inferred.
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