The Use of Repair Strategies by Children With and Without Hearing Impairment Purpose: This study examined how students with hearing impairments, having different levels of speech intelligibility, responded to a communication breakdown as compared to students with normal hearing. Method: Participants included 16 students with profound hearing impairment who were assessed as having age-appropriate expressive language (8 with good speech intelligibility and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2002
The Use of Repair Strategies by Children With and Without Hearing Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tova Most, PhD
    Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv
  • Contact author: Tova Most, PhD, School of Education, Special Education and Department of Communication Disorders, Tel-Aviv University, P.O.B 39040, Ramat-Aviv, Tel-Aviv 69978, Israel.
    Contact author: Tova Most, PhD, School of Education, Special Education and Department of Communication Disorders, Tel-Aviv University, P.O.B 39040, Ramat-Aviv, Tel-Aviv 69978, Israel.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: tovam@post.tau.ac.il
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2002
The Use of Repair Strategies by Children With and Without Hearing Impairment
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2002, Vol. 33, 112-123. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2002/009)
History: Received December 20, 2000 , Accepted January 10, 2002
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2002, Vol. 33, 112-123. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2002/009)
History: Received December 20, 2000; Accepted January 10, 2002

Purpose: This study examined how students with hearing impairments, having different levels of speech intelligibility, responded to a communication breakdown as compared to students with normal hearing.

Method: Participants included 16 students with profound hearing impairment who were assessed as having age-appropriate expressive language (8 with good speech intelligibility and 8 with poor speech intelligibility) and 10 students with normal hearing, ages 11–18 years. The students’ task was to describe pictures and to respond to a series of three clarification requests ("Huh?," "What?," and "I didn’t understand") presented by the examiner.

Results: Repetition was the most frequently used strategy by all groups. However, significant differences emerged in the use of other repair strategies among the three groups. The group’s choice of strategies across the three requests also differed significantly.

Clinical Implications: Although the groups evidenced similar levels of age-appropriate expressive language, they appeared to differ in its pragmatic use. It was suggested that strategy training programs should consider the speech intelligibility of the speaker and be tailored according to individual needs.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
The author would like to express her appreciation to Dee B. Ankonina for her editorial contribution and to Nava Nakash for her role in the data collection.
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