Emotion Regulation in Children With Specific Language Impairment Purpose: The purpose of this preliminary study was to determine if emotion regulation warrants investigation as a factor influencing social outcomes in children with specific language impairment (SLI). Emotion regulation was evaluated in children with SLI and their typically developing peers. Method: Teachers were asked to rate the emotion regulation ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2002
Emotion Regulation in Children With Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Martin Fujiki, PhD
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Bonnie Brinton
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Diane Clarke
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Martin Fujiki, PhD, Audiology & Speech Language Pathology, Brigham Young University, 130 TLRB, Provo, UT 84602-1241.
    Martin Fujiki, PhD, Audiology & Speech Language Pathology, Brigham Young University, 130 TLRB, Provo, UT 84602-1241.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: martin_fujiki@byu.edu
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2002
Emotion Regulation in Children With Specific Language Impairment
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2002, Vol. 33, 102-111. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2002/008)
History: Received March 15, 2001 , Accepted December 11, 2001
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2002, Vol. 33, 102-111. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2002/008)
History: Received March 15, 2001; Accepted December 11, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 78

Purpose: The purpose of this preliminary study was to determine if emotion regulation warrants investigation as a factor influencing social outcomes in children with specific language impairment (SLI). Emotion regulation was evaluated in children with SLI and their typically developing peers.

Method: Teachers were asked to rate the emotion regulation behaviors of 41 children with SLI and 41 typical peers using the "Emotion Regulation Checklist" (ERC, Shields & Cicchetti, 1997; 1998). Children were sampled from two age levels (6–9 years and 10–13 years). At each age level, equal numbers of boys and girls were sampled.

Results: As a group, children with SLI received significantly lower ratings than typical children. In addition, girls produced higher scores than boys. None of the other interactions was significant. Scores on the two subscales of the ERC, labeled as lability/negativity and emotion regulation, were then examined to further delineate performance. Boys with SLI had notably lower ratings than all the other groups on the emotion regulation subscale.

Clinical Implications: Emotion regulation warrants further research to determine if it is associated with specific social outcomes in children with SLI.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This work was supported, in part, by a research grant from the David O. McKay School of Education, Brigham Young University. We would like to thank Elaine Silliman, Patricia Prelock, and two anonymous reviewers for their helpful comments and suggestions. We would also like to thank Becky Almerico, Allen Gurney, Jean Gunn, Lisa Higbee, Janet Howe, Kristi Kitchen, Emily Larsen, Michele Lundell, Elizabeth Nealson, Kris Oleson, Ginger Pierce, Debbie Taggart, and Kristine Tanner for their assistance in participant identification. Finally, we would like to acknowledge Annette Jerome for her contributions to this work, as well as Shelley Burton and Shane James, who worked as research assistants on this project.
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