Epilogue: Recent Advances in Phonological Theory and Treatment Part II Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   January 01, 2002
Epilogue: Recent Advances in Phonological Theory and Treatment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jessica A. Barlow
    San Diego State University, CA
  • Contact author: Jessica A. Barlow, Department of Communicative Disorders, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-1518.
    Contact author: Jessica A. Barlow, Department of Communicative Disorders, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-1518.×
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: jbarlow@mail.sdsu.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Forum: Advances in Phonological Theory and Treatment
Clinical Forum   |   January 01, 2002
Epilogue: Recent Advances in Phonological Theory and Treatment
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2002, Vol. 33, 67-69. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2002/006)
History: Received October 26, 2001 , Accepted November 1, 2001
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2002, Vol. 33, 67-69. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2002/006)
History: Received October 26, 2001; Accepted November 1, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1
The articles within this clinical forum have considered the interaction between phonology and other aspects of language and language learning. These interactions are shown to critically influence the development of language generally, and phonology specifically. Furthermore, the contributors demonstrate that this interaction has important clinical implications for the treatment of children with language difficulties.
From a developmental perspective, Velleman and Vihman argue that early difficulty in lexical learning may result in phonological disorder later on. Deficits in implicit learning, for example, may result in a child’s lack of knowledge about the structural and segmental characteristics of the adult phonology (i.e., the types of sounds and syllable shapes that occur). Deficits in explicit learning may be attributable to the lack of knowledge about the structural and/or segmental characteristics of individual words, resulting in incorrect mental or underlying representations (URs) for lexical forms. In such cases, the child may use all of the sounds and structures of the target language, but may not use them consistently or target-appropriately. Alternatively, a child may not have difficulty with either implicit or explicit learning, but instead may remain in the template stage of development, even after the child has established a fairly large lexicon and (consequently) a great deal of homonymy. Importantly, these different types of breakdown may require different strategies for intervention. The authors speculate as to what treatment procedures would be most appropriate for each of these difficulties, leaving open the need for future research that experimentally evaluates these recommendations.
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